Eliza O. Barrios

Portrait of Eliza O. Barrios and two other womenMidori has collaborated frequently with Eliza Barrios since 2012 on several projects. These include:

  • 2013     Bridge of Mud & Feathers, Oaxaca, Mexico.
  • 2013    “Threshold”  (provided rope styling for video footage)

http://elizabarrios.com

Eliza O. Barrios, based in San Francisco, is an interdisciplinary artist. Working primarily in new media and site-specific installation, Barrios questions systems of belief by exploring various processes of self-reflection. Barrios holds a Bachelor of Arts from San Francisco State University and a Masters of Fine Arts from Mills College.

Barrios’ work has been exhibited at museums, new media and film festivals internationally and domestically, including the Museum of Contemporary Art (Oahu, Hawaii), Mag:Net: Gallery – Katipunan (Manila, Philippines), Intersection for the Arts (San Francisco, CA), Optica Festival (Gijón, Spain), New Forms Festival (Vancouver, Canada) and the International Turin Gay & Lesbian Film Festival (Turin, Italy). She has received an Honorary Fellowship from the Djerassi Resident Artists Program and has served as Juror for Alliance of Artists Communities’ Visions From New California Fellowship.

Barrios is also part of Mail Order Brides/M.O.B (with Jenifer Wofford and Reanne A. Estrada). Mail Order Brides/M.O.B. have been scheming, entertaining and creating together for over 15 years. Their work ranges from video, performative to public art. Mail Order Brides/M.O.B. have shown in various museums, galleries and film festivals including the DeYoung Museum (San Francisco, CA), Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (San Francisco, CA), the Mix Festival (New York, NY), SF International Lesbian and Gay Film Festival (San Francisco CA) and the Luggage Store Gallery (San Francisco, CA).

Closeup of painted face

Artist Statement

My work explores and questions the various tangible and intangible elements that ‘make up’ a person – their subjectivity, their motivations – their ‘internal belief system.’ My pieces act as a catalyst for self reflection, both metaphorically and literally. Through the use of various visual devices I orchestrate subtle environments/encounters that subliminally navigate the viewer to question their own perceptions of beliefs with regard to cultural histories, personal relations and the temporal notion of time and location.